Posted in Coursework, Part 4

Project 5 The moving figure

Comparison of movement representations

The course notes suggest:

Look at the energy in this fast brush drawing by Richard Hambleton; …Now go to David Haines’ website and find  the drawing New Balance Sneakers vs KFC Bucket. Note the more restrained movement of the figures …

The two images are:

As the course notes indicate, these are very different approaches to drawing movement. They both use the stance of the subjects as part of conveying the movement in the scene. David Haines’ scene is rendered almost as a fast frame photograph and has taken many hours to complete. Richard Hambleton’s, in contrast, feels like it was painted in near real time.

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Posted in Coursework, Part 4

Approaching Part 4

Looking through the course text the volume of work for Part 4 is, again, massive. Six projects with a total of 15 exercises and 5 Research points. At the end of all that there is an assignment involving 2 drawings of A1 size and another of any size. Added to all of the volume is the subject matter, which I have been struggling with for an extended period already. See my past Life Drawing if you doubt me on that one. This is leading to a need for choices to be made.

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Posted in Notes, Research & Reflection

Figure Drawing Research

This may be a bit of a strange post, as I am effectively documenting a set of resources that I’ve been using to try to improve my figure drawing. Most of them I’ve collected together fairly recently, but some I’ve been using for a while. I can’t say the list is exhaustive but this is an area I’ve been struggling with for a while, as I suspect do many people when learning to draw figures. This means I’ve collected quite a few sources of information, and am identifying some of the key ones here to give an idea of the signposts that I’ve found to point me in roughly the right direction. I think between them these resources provide the information I need to make progress. Now I need a lot of practice and reflection. Continue reading “Figure Drawing Research”

Posted in Notes, Research & Reflection, Sketchbook

Drawing with rhythm

I came an interesting section about drawing with rhythm in Andrew Loomis’ book “Figure Drawing for all its worth.” (PDF available here.) He describes drawing with rhythm as following through the major lines of forms in various graceful curves as part of the setup. The drawing on page 136 is of particular interest in this respect. As an experiment in this approach I tried a drawing of a dancer. Although I am unhappy with many of the details of the image, the basic idea of building up the form with interesting curves was very useful. Now I just need to learn a whole bunch about anatomy.